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Mark Dabney - Distance (First Track from NEW THING)

We’re less than 2 weeks out from the release of New Thing, and tonight I’m thrilled to debut the first track off the album. 

Distance

"Distance" started life during the 50/90 songwriting challenge in 2010. I was lucky enough to collaborate with EchoVoodoo, an awesome electronica and folk musician from Canada. He had a keyboard riff section he liked, and passed it off to me. I liked it so much, I wrote and recorded the rest of the song in an evening.

What’s here is a new mix and master by Rob. I really dig the work he did on this track to bring out the depth of sound.

I hope you enjoy it.

-Mark

New Thing - Coming May 15th

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Alabaster Woman

Rob’s Note: This is an unusual song for Mark and I for a few reasons. Typically the vocalist for a Really Good Pot Roast song is whoever wrote the lyrics. This is one of only 2 songs we have that is an exception to the loose rule. The other thing that makes it unusual is the prose. I was in a rhyming rut when I wrote these lyrics so Mark suggested I forget about writing a song and just write a story. We’d worry about song structure later. Mark saw this story and just put it to music without revision. (Actually, that’s a lie. The 3rd verse was rewritten because the original had too many words in it). The narrative of the song was missing something until Mark added the bridge.

Mark’s Note: Rob and I have been kicking this song around for a little while. We shelved it for a bit, but came back to it recently. This song is a bit of a groove feel to it, simply arranged. It’s our 12th collaboration of FiftyNinety.  The song turned out well, and  I think the demo has some legs and can stand on it’s own for a while.

Rob’s lyrics are awesome here.  Like he said, they started more focused on the narrative, and I just found music that worked around it.  This song is a look into the trappings of suburbia, and peeling back the layers of the neighbors you know only in passing, and what they could really be. It’s like telling a story three times, but getting into more uncomfortable details each time. Not everything is as perfect as it seems.